nativeamericannews
nativeamericannews:

5 Things Educators Should Know Before Teaching Native Culture and History
It’s summer, and teachers across Turtle Island will probably be thinking about their lesson plans for the coming school year soon. A question was recently posed to ICTMN wondering what teachers should know before approaching American Indian culture and history with their classrooms, so we started thinking about some basic answers.

nativeamericannews:

5 Things Educators Should Know Before Teaching Native Culture and History


It’s summer, and teachers across Turtle Island will probably be thinking about their lesson plans for the coming school year soon. A question was recently posed to ICTMN wondering what teachers should know before approaching American Indian culture and history with their classrooms, so we started thinking about some basic answers.


girlwithalessonplan
teachnologies:

What an Effective Teacher’s Classroom Looks Like
This isn’t the most surprisingly list persay, but it’s interesting to see everything laid out. Here are a few from the effective teacher portion of the list:


Lessons are inviting and exciting.
The students do most of the talking and the doing, prompted by the teacher’s questioning and guidance.
Routines and procedures are evident. Students know exactly what is expected of them.
There are no teacher warnings for student misbehavior. If a rule is broken, a consequence follows. If a procedure isn’t followed, the teacher provides more practice.



For later reading.

teachnologies:

What an Effective Teacher’s Classroom Looks Like

This isn’t the most surprisingly list persay, but it’s interesting to see everything laid out. Here are a few from the effective teacher portion of the list:

  • Lessons are inviting and exciting.
  • The students do most of the talking and the doing, prompted by the teacher’s questioning and guidance.
  • Routines and procedures are evident. Students know exactly what is expected of them.
  • There are no teacher warnings for student misbehavior. If a rule is broken, a consequence follows. If a procedure isn’t followed, the teacher provides more practice.

For later reading.

girlwithalessonplan

Student teacher roundup

girlwithalessonplan:

dudeedu:

Looking to find the others who are student teaching, especially if you are starting in January and plan to share some of your experiences on your blog! Like or reblog this post so we student teachers can check you out. Maybe, it’ll help with the nerves.

You should make a Google form and start curating a list like we did for the roll call.

I’m one, but I’ll be done in Dec.

feministjewishfangirl
A quarter of high schools with the highest percentage of black and Latino students do not offer Algebra II; a third of these schools do not offer chemistry. Fewer than half of American Indian and Native-Alaskan high school students have access to the full range of math and science courses in their high school
moniquill

nitanahkohe:

signs, Edgar Heap of Birds (Southern Cheyenne)

artist’s statement:

The oppression and slaughter of human beings by white American society does not only come from hatred; greed and potential impediment to economic growth also feed the frenzy to kill and destroy people of color and spirits that grow from the soil or move the surface that is our earth. It is therefore proper we inform the Minnesota public to honor those forty Dakota tribal citizens who were executed by hanging in Minnesota in 1862 and 1865 by order of Presidents Abraham Lincoln and Andrew Johnson with the support of the citizens of Minnesota.

As a sign of respect, forty Dakota-English, red lettered metal signs were exhibited originally in 1990 in the earth in the business zone of what was called the Grain Belt.

This is a proud historical districts of the city of Minneapolis and the state of Minnesota that houses the grain and flour mills, canals, and facilities to ship out fruits to “American progress..”

It was the potential disruption of American commerce that cost Dakota people their lives. The Native tribes of the Upper Midwest were not allowed the sovereignty and dignity to provide for their own economic livelihood through hunting and gathering. The Native land base of this region, as in all America, was not given the right to exist intact in a prominent way and was automatically superseded by white invading immigrants and their hunger to cultivate and consume more of this earth.

As the forty signs are now offered in the Nash Gallery symbolically along the water called the Mississippi, which remains a highway for American business, we seek not only to extract profit from our surroundings. We also wish to honor life-giving force of the waters that have truly preserved all of us from the beginning, and to offer respect to the tortured spirits of 1862 and 1865 that may have sought refuge and renewal through the original purity that is water.