girlwithalessonplan
girlwithalessonplan:

theatlantic:

Why Shakespeare Belongs in Prison

It’s his 450th birthday, and The Bard has never appealed to a wider or more diverse audience. American higher-ed English departments may be teaching him less than they used to, but the Internet and modern film and TV interpretations have helped democratize appreciation of his works around the world. That’s only fitting: In Shakespeare’s era, the royalty in attendance at his productions was joined by crowds of commoners called “groundlings” and “stinkards” who paid a penny to stand in the pit, sweltering in the heat, while even more milled about outside. 
There’s one “commoner” population to whom Shakespeare can hold special significance: convicts. Recent decades have seen a proliferation of programs in prisons, jails, and juvenile detention centers meant to introduce the accused to works found in the Folios and Quartos. While arts outreach efforts in correctional environments are nothing new, any diehard Shakespearean might recognize how his works appeal uniquely to the criminally accused, one of society’s most marginalized populations.
Laura Bates, author of Shakespeare Saved My Life: Ten Years in Solitary With the Bard, described teaching the plays in a super-max facility housing the most violent criminals in the system in an interview last year with NPR. The book’s title comes from the words of one inmate, convicted of murder as a teenager and placed in solitary confinement for years.
“The day that I came knocking on his cell door,” Bates explained, “his life had been so desperate, so bleak for so many years that he was literally at the point of suicide. And so in that sense by Shakespeare coming along, presenting something positive in his life for maybe the first time, giving him a new direction, it did literally keep him from taking his own life.”
Read more. [Image: AP]


Dr. Bates was my professor at Indiana State!  woo!

girlwithalessonplan:

theatlantic:

Why Shakespeare Belongs in Prison

It’s his 450th birthday, and The Bard has never appealed to a wider or more diverse audience. American higher-ed English departments may be teaching him less than they used to, but the Internet and modern film and TV interpretations have helped democratize appreciation of his works around the world. That’s only fitting: In Shakespeare’s era, the royalty in attendance at his productions was joined by crowds of commoners called “groundlings” and “stinkards” who paid a penny to stand in the pit, sweltering in the heat, while even more milled about outside. 

There’s one “commoner” population to whom Shakespeare can hold special significance: convicts. Recent decades have seen a proliferation of programs in prisons, jails, and juvenile detention centers meant to introduce the accused to works found in the Folios and Quartos. While arts outreach efforts in correctional environments are nothing new, any diehard Shakespearean might recognize how his works appeal uniquely to the criminally accused, one of society’s most marginalized populations.

Laura Bates, author of Shakespeare Saved My Life: Ten Years in Solitary With the Bard, described teaching the plays in a super-max facility housing the most violent criminals in the system in an interview last year with NPR. The book’s title comes from the words of one inmate, convicted of murder as a teenager and placed in solitary confinement for years.

“The day that I came knocking on his cell door,” Bates explained, “his life had been so desperate, so bleak for so many years that he was literally at the point of suicide. And so in that sense by Shakespeare coming along, presenting something positive in his life for maybe the first time, giving him a new direction, it did literally keep him from taking his own life.”

Read more. [Image: AP]

Dr. Bates was my professor at Indiana State!  woo!

Organizing My Classroom #1

So, one of the women at the pane last week said we (teachers to be) should totally imagine our classroom, so that if we start right before the school year we don’t have to panic over what it looks like and basic systems.  Here’s what I’ve got.

I think desks grouped in fours for sure.  Hopefully they will have storage in them, but have students understand they’ll move desks over the course of the semester — For working groups, and skill groups, and whatever.

I like K’s idea of having students correct each other’s homework.  I’ll circulate while It’s happening to confirm, but then I don’t have to correct it.  I will definitely frame homework as a way to practice skills, a tool, thing. 

However, I will need to collect some of their work and drafts of projects so I’m going to want a basket.  Not on my desk, because that means students may approach during other conferences, which I don’t want.  So, maybe in the corner of a room. 

I really like the hanging file folder system where each folder is a different status (I could teach it/I get it/I kinda get it/HALP, or Ready to present, finishing up, writing, drafting), but I’m not sure how I’ll use it. 

I want a teacher library in a reading nook with some books featured.  The featured books will change with my units.

There will definitely be one or two animal tanks!

I’m not sure if older kids will respond to a behavior chart, but I’m gonna give it a try — brown or black is gonna be the best color through, and red the worst. 

One bulletin board for key words (ELA) one for math, and one for the core/theme unit. 

Definitely 2-3 posters on the wall of art.  Hopefully a small bulletin board of postcards and etc. with images from art and places and people all over the world.

Yes, absolutely, the students need mailboxes.  They will be for things going to them — their work, school notes, etc.  But, the boxes should be small.

fedoriarty

medievalpoc:

livestockmenace:

medievalpoc:

Spanning one-ninth of the earth’s circumference across three continents, the Roman Empire ruled a quarter of humanity through complex networks of political power, military domination and economic exchange. These extensive connections were sustained by premodern transportation and communication technologies that relied on energy generated by human and animal bodies, winds, and currents.

Conventional maps that represent this world as it appears from space signally fail to capture the severe environmental constraints that governed the flows of people, goods and information. Cost, rather than distance, is the principal determinant of connectivity.

For the first time, ORBIS allows us to express Roman communication costs in terms of both time and expense. By simulating movement along the principal routes of the Roman road network, the main navigable rivers, and hundreds of sea routes in the Mediterranean, Black Sea and coastal Atlantic, this interactive model reconstructs the duration and financial cost of travel in antiquity.

Taking account of seasonal variation and accommodating a wide range of modes and means of transport, ORBIS reveals the true shape of the Roman world and provides a unique resource for our understanding of premodern history.

Not gonna lie, this is kind of amazing.

Basically, you can plan a trip from Rome to Alexandria, and get an estimate of journey time, expense of trip, the supplies you’ll need….let’s just say it’s better than Oregon Trail:

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Does this mean that we could plan our pilgrimage via amphibious kayak?!?

As long as you plan to do it two thousand years ago.

Which apparently might be possible since some of my readers found a Medieval TARDIS:

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Although…. the dress code for Medieval TARDIS travel might be slightly problematic.

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