girlwithalessonplan

teachmoments:

One of the better “nuts and bolts” investigations I’ve read into the problems urban schools deal with on a daily, monthly, and yearly basis. 

fatnutritionist
Since her death in 1979, the woman who discovered what the universe is made of has not so much as received a memorial plaque. Her newspaper obituaries do not mention her greatest discovery. […] Every high school student knows that Isaac Newton discovered gravity, that Charles Darwin discovered evolution, and that Albert Einstein discovered the relativity of time. But when it comes to the composition of our universe, the textbooks simply say that the most abundant atom in the universe is hydrogen. And no one ever wonders how we know.

Jeremy Knowles, discussing the complete lack of recognition Cecilia Payne gets, even today, for her revolutionary discovery. (via alliterate)

OH WAIT LEMME TELL YOU ABOUT CECILIA PAYNE.

Cecilia Payne’s mother refused to spend money on her college education, so she won a scholarship to Cambridge.

Cecilia Payne completed her studies, but Cambridge wouldn’t give her a degree because she was a woman, so she said fuck that and moved to the United States to work at Harvard.

Cecilia Payne was the first person ever to earn a Ph.D. in astronomy from Radcliffe College, with what Otto Strauve called “the most brilliant Ph.D. thesis ever written in astronomy.”

Not only did Cecilia Payne discover what the universe is made of, she also discovered what the sun is made of (Henry Norris Russell, a fellow astronomer, is usually given credit for discovering that the sun’s composition is different from the Earth’s, but he came to his conclusions four years later than Payne—after telling her not to publish).

Cecilia Payne is the reason we know basically anything about variable stars (stars whose brightness as seen from earth fluctuates). Literally every other study on variable stars is based on her work.

Cecilia Payne was the first woman to be promoted to full professor from within Harvard, and is often credited with breaking the glass ceiling for women in the Harvard science department and in astronomy, as well as inspiring entire generations of women to take up science.

Cecilia Payne is awesome and everyone should know her.

(via bansheewhale)

nativeamericannews
nativeamericannews:

5 Things Educators Should Know Before Teaching Native Culture and History
It’s summer, and teachers across Turtle Island will probably be thinking about their lesson plans for the coming school year soon. A question was recently posed to ICTMN wondering what teachers should know before approaching American Indian culture and history with their classrooms, so we started thinking about some basic answers.

nativeamericannews:

5 Things Educators Should Know Before Teaching Native Culture and History


It’s summer, and teachers across Turtle Island will probably be thinking about their lesson plans for the coming school year soon. A question was recently posed to ICTMN wondering what teachers should know before approaching American Indian culture and history with their classrooms, so we started thinking about some basic answers.


girlwithalessonplan
teachnologies:

What an Effective Teacher’s Classroom Looks Like
This isn’t the most surprisingly list persay, but it’s interesting to see everything laid out. Here are a few from the effective teacher portion of the list:


Lessons are inviting and exciting.
The students do most of the talking and the doing, prompted by the teacher’s questioning and guidance.
Routines and procedures are evident. Students know exactly what is expected of them.
There are no teacher warnings for student misbehavior. If a rule is broken, a consequence follows. If a procedure isn’t followed, the teacher provides more practice.



For later reading.

teachnologies:

What an Effective Teacher’s Classroom Looks Like

This isn’t the most surprisingly list persay, but it’s interesting to see everything laid out. Here are a few from the effective teacher portion of the list:

  • Lessons are inviting and exciting.
  • The students do most of the talking and the doing, prompted by the teacher’s questioning and guidance.
  • Routines and procedures are evident. Students know exactly what is expected of them.
  • There are no teacher warnings for student misbehavior. If a rule is broken, a consequence follows. If a procedure isn’t followed, the teacher provides more practice.

For later reading.

girlwithalessonplan

Student teacher roundup

girlwithalessonplan:

dudeedu:

Looking to find the others who are student teaching, especially if you are starting in January and plan to share some of your experiences on your blog! Like or reblog this post so we student teachers can check you out. Maybe, it’ll help with the nerves.

You should make a Google form and start curating a list like we did for the roll call.

I’m one, but I’ll be done in Dec.